PNW Giant

April 25, 2011

This photo shows Amoeba with a cross section of a Pacific Northwest Douglas Fir tree.  These trees can live for a thousand years, primarily because they have a very thick bark that allows them to survive many pestilence attacks and moderate fires.

Technically, the Douglas Fir isn’t a true fir tree, as evidenced by a close look at the “needles” and the cones. I considered using “fake fur” as today’s Punny Monday answer, but I figured you’d all be even less likely to guess that.

Douglas Fir trees are the most commonly marketed Christmas trees in the United States.  They are usually trimmed to a perfect cone shape when young, and then they continue to grow that way.  The Noble Fir and Grand Fir are also sold as Christmas trees.


Quilly is the pseudonym of Charlene L. Amsden, who lives in the Pacific Northwest. When she is not doing book reviews or creating curriculum literature units, she is working on writing the next great American novel. You may visit her writing blog at http://charlene-amsden.com. Quilly is the pseudonym of Charlene L. Amsden, who lives in the Pacific Northwest. When she is not doing book reviews or creating curriculum literature units, she is working on writing the next great American novel. You may visit her writing blog at http://charlene-amsden.com.


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About the author

Quilly is the pseudonym of Charlene L. Amsden, who lives in the Pacific Northwest. When she is not doing book reviews or creating curriculum literature units, she is working on writing the next great American novel. You may visit her writing blog at http://charlene-amsden.com.

11 Comments

  • gigi-hawaiiNo Gravatar says:

    Has Amoeba shaved his beard off? Looks like an entirely different person! How about a close up?

    • QuillyNo Gravatar says:

      Gigi — Amoeba has his beard back now, but he was without it for 3 months because he had a mole removed from his lip that proved to be cancerous and had to have more removed. This photo shows him after the first procedure healed and just before the second one. All is well now.

  • church ladyNo Gravatar says:

    Douglas Firs certainly do make a pretty Christmas Trees.

  • JimNo Gravatar says:

    .
    Amoeba is a fine, noble fellow. 🙂
    Even if he does stand beside a Douglas ‘fir’ and not a Noble Fir tree.
    ..

    • QuillyNo Gravatar says:

      The Noble Fir is a high altitude tree, Jim. We live at sea level. To tell you the truth, today is the first time I’ve ever heard of it, even though my daddy was a logger and I thought I knew trees.

  • KellyNo Gravatar says:

    Hi Quilly,

    I can’t find an email address to contact you at so I’ll leave this message in the comment section.

    I wanted to let you know about the “It’s Never Too Late Writing Contest” that the Impowerage Magazine is sponsoring. We are looking for stories on how it’s never to late to try something new, be active, or embrace new technologies like blogging.

    The top prize is $500 and your story would be published in the Impowerage magazine. Please see the link below for more details
    http://impowerage.com/news/it-is-never-too-late-writing-contest

    • QuillyNo Gravatar says:

      Thanks, Kelly, I’ll check it out. unfortunately, I am barely over 50 and did all my interesting stuff between 45-50 years old!

  • nessaNo Gravatar says:

    That’s some big wood. 🙂

  • PegNo Gravatar says:

    That’s some huge tree! As far as Christmas Trees … I’m really partial to the Noble Fir….. AND it’s way to early to be thinking about Christmas again….

  • musingsNo Gravatar says:

    I like the no beard look, too. I’m glad he got the cancerous mole found and removed! Sad to know that giant tree had to fall.

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